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Nylon Connecticut State Flag

Size(s) available:

3 by 5 foot

$42.99 $29.97

Flag Questions

When was the Connecticut state flag adopted?

The state flag of Connecticut was officially adopted by the General Assembly in 1897. The flag’s design is inspired by the Seal of Saybrook Colony when it was established in 1639.

Where can I buy a Connecticut Flag?

A beautiful Connecticut state Flag is sold by Star Spangled Flags and it has awesome reviews. A huge plus is that it is 100% made in the U.S.A! Also, it is made of a heavyweight durable Nylon specifically treated to dry fast and resist sun and chemical deterioration. All of the hems are sewn using superior lock stitches to prevent unraveling. The fly end has four rows of lock stitching to improve durability, increase flag life and prevent fading.

How do I fly my Connecticut flag with my American flag?

When flying the Connecticut flag with the flag of the United States on the same pole, the flag of United States must always be at the top and the Connecticut flag should be the same size or smaller. When It is flown on separate poles, the Connecticut flag will be to the right of the flag of the United States situating the U.S. flag in the position of honor, which is to the observer’s left of the other flags.

What is the design on the Connecticut state flag and what does it symbolize?

The state flag of Connecticut consists of a blue field on which lies a white baroque (style characterized by ornate detail) shield. The shield contains three grapevines, each bearing three bunches of purple grapes. Below the shield is a white banner with the state motto: “Qui Transtulit Sustinet”, Latin for “He who transplanted still sustains”, based on the 80th Psalm in the Bible. The three grapevines and three bunches of grapes represent three vibrant colonies (Connecticut, New Haven, and Saybrook) and the first three towns founded by Europeans (Hartford, Wethersfield, and Windsor). The colonies were thought of as grapevines that had been transplanted.

Product Description

In Connecticut, the law prohibits the disposal of used razor blades. So it’s a puzzle how they dispose of their old ones unless they’re into recycling. Connecticut law also states that a pickle can only be officially called a pickle if it bounces. So do you think they also have an official pickle bouncer?

Although Connecticut passed some strange laws, many fun things also started in Connecticut, it’s home to the first lollipop machine, first hamburger, first nuclear-powered submarine, first telephone book, first Polaroid camera, first helicopter and first colored TV. It was also the very first state to issue a speed limit on automobiles (12 MPH) in 1901 and the first to issue permanent license plates to cars in 1937.

The State of Connecticut is named after the Connecticut River which is a major river in the state. It’s given the nickname The Constitution State because of its role during the federal constitutional convention of 1787. But the state has also earned unofficial nicknames such as the Provisions Ste, The Land of Steady Habits, and the most popular, The Nutmeg State.

Sailors during the 18th to 19th centuries used to bring nutmeg seed on their long journeys and quickly became peddlers of this valuable seed. This is how the state earned their unofficial nickname The Nutmeg State.

It is bordered by Long Island Sound to the south, Massachusetts to the north, Rhode island to the east and New York to the west.

But you’ll get to know more about the State of Connecticut and its locals by the celebrations and festivals they observe in their region. Their official state holiday’s include:

  • New Year’s Day – January 1st
  • Martin Luther King’s Day – Third Monday of January
  • Lincoln’s Birthday – February 12th
  • Washington’s Birthday – February 16th
  • Good Friday – Month of April (not fixed)
  • Memorial Day – Last Monday of May
  • Independence Day – July 4th but celebrated July 3rd
  • Labor Day – First Monday of September
  • Columbus Day – Second Monday of October
  • Veteran’s Day – November 11th
  • Thanksgiving Day – Last Thursday of November
  • Christmas Day –December 25th

Other festivals that draw out locals to the streets to enjoy food, music, some live entertainment, booths and other crafts include:

  • Milford Oyster Festival
    A family-oriented event held every 3rd Saturday of August. This has been an ongoing tradition
    for 34 years. It attracts both local and tourists from across the globe who want to take part in
    various activities connecting Connecticut to its seafaring past.
  • Greater Hartford Festival of Jazz
    More than 50,000 jazz fanatics gather for a 3 day of the jazz festival. International and local
    musicians get on stage and entice eager jazz-fans. The festival is held in mid-July and is one of
    the fastest growing events in Hartford.
  • Durham Fair
    An estimated 200,000 people attend this fair every last weekend of September. The fair started
    in 1916 and features agricultural programs, exhibits, country music, and food.
  • Parade Spectacular
    The event showcases giant helium-filled balloons, award-winning marching bands, dozens of
    clowns, live performers, magicians and a special participation of Santa Claus himself, it’s always
    a hit during mid-November.
    Claus himself.
  • Antique Vehicle Show
    For the last 15 years, the event has been exhibiting more than 100 vintage cars and the number
    is growing. And it’s not just cars, but sea vessels too. The two-day event presents marine art
    exhibitions, haunted sea vessels, and pre-1930 cars, trucks, and motorbikes.

If you want to get into the mood of these celebrations, get your flag and display it for everyone to see. Flying your flag means you’re a proud citizen of this state and of this country. Some neighborhoods even make it a tradition to fly flags on the street to let everyone know that they are united and in a celebratory mood.

Do you have a flag to fly for these joyful events? Are you still looking for a state flag? We can help you with that. Our US Made Flags are fashioned from heavyweight 200 denier nylon with fibers specially treated to resist chemical and sun damage. A strength that can’t be measured. Contact us today!

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