What is a Warrant Officer and How do I Become One?

14337746884_a0a881c2fc_zWhether you’re currently enlisted in the U.S. Army, or if you are thinking about enlisting, you’ve probably heard of the Warrant Officer job role. Warrant Officers have many responsibilities, including but not limited to organizing missions and offering expertise to other soldiers. But what exactly are Warrant Officers? And how do you become one? These are just a few of the questions that we’re going to answer today.

Warrant Officers: the Basics

In the U.S. Army, a Warrant Officer is a soldier who specialized in technical elements, including but not limited to intelligence gathering, aviation, police, etc. Consisting of less than 3% of the entire armed forces, they are a relatively small component of the Army. But don’t let this fool you into thinking they are insignificant. Warrant Officers play a key role in the overall function of the U.S. Army, providing their technical expertise to help achieve their respective missions and goals.

It’s important to note that Warrant Officers are capable of performing a wide variety of tasks, ranging from command detachments to the deployment of vessels, aircraft and armored vehicles. However, their primary duty is to provide technique expertise and guidance to commanders and soldiers in the field.

How to Become a Warrant Officer

If you are interested in becoming a Warrant Officer, you must first be selected to join Warrant Officer Candidate School (WOCS). WOCS is typically held in Fort Rucker, and applicants must have achieved a rank of Staff Sergeant/E-6 to be eligible for consideration. This school will analyze candidates’ skills to determine whether or not they are qualified to become a Warrant Officer. WOCS has similar training requirements to those of the Officer Candidates School (OCS).

Warrant Officer Requirements

While we recommend speaking with an Army recruiter, here are some of the general requirements for becoming a Warrant Officer.

  • High school diploma
  • 17 years of age at time of enlistment, and under 33 years of age at time of selection for aviators or 46 years of age for other specialties (note: exceptions are made on a case-by-case basis).
  • Legal U.S. citizenship.
  • Score 110 or higher on the Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).
  • Minimum of 12 months remaining on enlistment contract.
  • Meet the screening height and weight standards.
  • Pass the three-event Army Physical Fitness Test within six months of having application boarded.
  • Pass the physical examination.
  • Meet medical and fitness standards within 24 months of date of application.
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